consumerism: why nice pill organizers are important

(Alternate title: “I’m running late and had craziness-related crap today and yesterday, so I’m wiped and have no science for tonight, just opinions.” Science will return soon.)

So: Pill organizers.  The most common ones are the little plastic ones that cost a dollar and something here.  When I see them, I think “old people”.  Old age is a desirable phase of life to have after you’ve had some other phases of life, and I plan at some point to either slam into old age with gusto or grow gracefully into it, but I would like to do so after going through everything from late twenties until sixty-five-ish or whatever age “old age” is at when I arrive.  So I’d like to have a little more marketing to my pill organizers.

My medications are a central component of my health, both physical and mental.   Plus, I have to look at the damn box twice a day every day and will probably have to look at it at least that frequently for the rest of my life.  I’d like something that makes me feel better about my crappy mental health, that looks nice on my desktop or table, and that looks like something I might actually want to buy.

Some people want something completely inexpensive and utilitarian, and I think that’s an absolutely necessary option to have.  For me, I want something that says “I treat my mental health with care” and “I exercise taste in decorating my living room”.  (This may sound like I’m making a big deal out of something small – but it’s something that the functionality of my life revolves around, even more than my computer, and I have an attractive, highly functional bag for that.)

I also think old people should not be limited to cheap plastic crap.  I sure as hell hope I’ve got nicer stuff when I get there, ideally for not too much more money.  I understand the boomers are supposed to be reforming old age, though, so maybe they’ll take care of that.  That’d be nice.

So, some links:

Med-Sun.  They have a badly designed flash site that plays music at you, but they have attractive cheap plastic crap.

Pascoe’s Wood Art.  Gorgeous, completely unaffordable ($230 for a cheap one), and only once-a-day for seven days.  I like the box that can hold the medication bottles under the tray that holds the medication, but I’d need a bigger box.

Detachable Pillbox.  I have one of these for my current pillbox.  Not because of the detachable part, but because the wells are deep so it doesn’t take up such a huge footprint on my desktop.  They also have ones for dogs, shaped like dog bones.  I think that is rather silly but it will prevent you from confusing it with your own, and I am quite certain that is a good thing.

I really want an enameled silver or inlaid wood one, which has the disadvantage of not only being almost certainly absurdly expensive, but also nonexistent.

Oh, and here’s a craft idea (which I did for a previous pillbox): For a very, very cheap sparkly pillbox, buy a cheap plastic crap pillbox, then buy some of the little rhinestone bling that they sell for cellphones (you can get at craft stores).  Apply as desired, ideally liberally and to everything in sight, not just the pillbox.  (They stick to your skin too, and will come off afterward!)

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One Response to consumerism: why nice pill organizers are important

  1. zendevil says:

    Fuck! You made me laugh; just after i lost the last post on the depression forum. It was a long one (but i bet they all say that!)

    Gaaaagh; being loopy is just one of those things isn’t it? We just sigh deeply & meaninglessly & get on with creating bone-shaped pillboxes.

    Gaaargh! I can’t remember whether i took the “happy pill” that seems to make me more unhappy. But the cat seems OK & she makes me happy.

    (“They tried to make me go to Rehab & she said Miaow, Miaow, Miaow”)

    Terri.

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